From the vice president and chief technologist for SOA at Oracle Corporation

Dave Chappell

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Latest Articles from Dave Chappell
According to Moore’s Law, processing speed and storage capacity have been doubling about every two years since the invention of the integrated circuit in 1958. Yet it seems that our propensity for building larger more complex software systems that anticipate these improvements inevitab...
The Open Services Gateway Initiative (OSGi) Alliance is working to realize the vision of a 'universal middleware' that will address issues such as application packaging, versioning, deployment, publication, and discovery. In this article we'll examine the need for the kind of container...
Financial institutions are pushing the envelope and require more processing capability, but without requiring exponential increase in hardware costs. The growth of extreme transaction processing (XTP) in areas such as fraud detection, risk computation, and stock trade resolution are pu...
As SOA becomes the prevailing model for enterprise infrastructures, unique architectural challenges need to be mastered in order to fully enjoy the capabilities SOA provides. SOA infrastructure must support operational flexibility, a heterogeneous application environment, global deploy...
Since releasing my latest book, Enterprise Service Bus (O'Reilly Media, 2004), I have been doing a fair amount of visiting corporations, conducting seminars, and generally discussing with enterprise architects the subject of enterprise service-oriented architecture (SOA) and how an ent...
Service-oriented architecture (SOA) represents the opportunity to achieve broad-scale interoperability, while providing the flexibility required to continually adapt technology to business requirements. No small feat, particularly when one considers the extent and complexity of today's...
The past several years have seen some significant technology trends, such as service-oriented architecture (SOA), enterprise application integration (EAI), business-to-business (B2B), and Web services. These technologies have attempted to address the challenges of improving the results...
This session examines the three leading choices for supporting service-oriented integration: enterprise service buses (ESBs), integration brokers, and application suite platforms. Making the right architectural decisions, Dave Chappell shows, is absolutely vital to ensuring success wit...
I recently attended the WS-ReliableMessaging Interop fest, hosted by IBM. IBM has published the results. The publishing of the results is something that the legal agreement allows the spec authors to do. A public version of the legal agreement and the test scenario document can be fo...
Web services have given newfound importance to service-oriented architectures and promise to drive down the cost of integration by providing a standards-based approach to interoperability between applications. The trouble is, what people really want is a new way of doing integration. U...
Message-centric vs RPC-style Web services is a long-standing debate and bone of contention regarding the proper use of Web services technologies. Early renditions of SOAP and XML-RPC were all about providing RPC-style interactions...in fact, that's all that was supported, so there real...
According to Gartner, Inc., vice president and research fellow Roy Schulte, 'a new form of enterprise service bus (ESB) infrastructure will be running in most major enterprises by 2005.' ESBs combine Web services, enterprise messaging, transformation, and routing to provide an integrat...
In a recent 'Strategic Planning' research note, Gartner issued a prediction that 'by 2004, more than 25 percent of all standard Web services traffic will be asynchronous....' and 'by 2006, more than 40 percent of the standard Web services traffic will be asynchronous.'
The Java API for XML Messaging (JAXM) is a new Java application programming interface (API) that provides a standard way for Java applications to send and receive Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) messages. The basic idea is to allow developers to spend more time building, sendi...
The Java Message Service (JMS) is a specification put forth by Sun to define a common set of APIs and common semantics for messaging-oriented middleware providers. An increasing number of MOM vendors have embraced this specification, and new vendors are building messaging products suit...
Every software system has logging requirements so application processing can be monitored and tracked. Modern distributed systems, which are usually based on application frameworks, require a logging solution that can cope with multiple processes on multiple hosts sending logging infor...
The notion of guaranteed delivery of Java Message Service messages has been lightly touched on in other recently published articles on JMS. But what really makes a JMS message 'guaranteed'? Should you just take it on faith, or would you like to know what's behind it?
Last month 'The JavaMessage Service and XSLT for E-Business Messaging' (XML-J, Vol. 2, issue 2) explored the concept of using JMS as the basis of a communications architecture for transporting XML data between applications and an XSLT translation engine for transforming business docume...
The Java Message Service (JMS) is an enterprise-capable middleware component based on message-oriented middleware (MOM) fundamentals. Since its introduction as a Java software specification in November 1998, vendor implementations have brought JMS forward as a first class, e-business m...
Benchmarking any distributed computing middleware product is a complex task. Knowing how well a distributed infrastructure will perform under heavy load with a large number of concurrently connected users is a key factor in planning a development and deployment strategy.
XML is the new lingua franca of interapplication communication and a very rich language for describing complex business data in a heterogeneous way. Today's business environment requires building new systems that exchange XML transactions between a diverse set of applications across ph...
(January 14, 2003) - On Thursday January 9, Sonic Software and a number of other leading IT vendors, including Fujitsu Limited, Hitachi, Ltd., NEC Corp, Oracle Corp., and Sun Microsystems, announced a proposal for a new Web services specification for reliable messaging: Web Services Re...
Open standards for reliable Web services messaging, such as WS-Reliability, can provide the missing link to bridge the gap between organizations and help make Web services a truly enterprise-capable technology for standards-based systems integration, says Web Services Journal technical...