From the vice president and chief technologist for SOA at Oracle Corporation

Dave Chappell

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Top Stories by Dave Chappell

Since releasing my latest book, Enterprise Service Bus (O'Reilly Media, 2004), I have been doing a fair amount of visiting corporations, conducting seminars, and generally discussing with enterprise architects the subject of enterprise service-oriented architecture (SOA) and how an enterprise service bus (ESB) backbone can be leveraged to provide a framework for an enterprise SOA. Along the way, I have been asked many questions about the nature of an ESB. I have also fended off some misconceptions that have been growing in the general IT population regarding what an ESB is and when, where, and how it can be used. I have gathered together the most popular questions and misconceptions, and offer some clarity in the form of a "top ten" list. Myth #1. ESB is just a new name for EAI. While many IT architecture groups are focusing on building SOAs, they still inevitably be... (more)

Reliable SOAP for Web Services Messaging Has Finally Arrived! Leading IT Vendors Join Forces to Create Web Services Reliability

(January 14, 2003) - On Thursday January 9, Sonic Software and a number of other leading IT vendors, including Fujitsu Limited, Hitachi, Ltd., NEC Corp, Oracle Corp., and Sun Microsystems, announced a proposal for a new Web services specification for reliable messaging: Web Services Reliability (WS-Reliability). The companies plan to submit WS-Reliability to a standards body on a royalty-free basis in the near future. Along with security, reliable asynchronous communications has been one of the gaping holes in today's Web services architecture. Lack of reliability, due to the inh... (more)

ESB Integration Patterns

The past several years have seen some significant technology trends, such as service-oriented architecture (SOA), enterprise application integration (EAI), business-to-business (B2B), and Web services. These technologies have attempted to address the challenges of improving the results and increasing the value of integrated business processes, and have garnered the widespread attention of IT leaders, vendors, and industry analysts. The enterprise service bus (ESB) draws the best traits from these and other technology trends to form a new architecture for integration. The ESB conc... (more)

The Java Message Service

The Java Message Service (JMS) is an enterprise-capable middleware component based on message-oriented middleware (MOM) fundamentals. Since its introduction as a Java software specification in November 1998, vendor implementations have brought JMS forward as a first class, e-business messaging communications platform suitable for exchanging critical business data over the Internet. This article is the first in a series of three that explain the application program interfaces (APIs), the message delivery semantics, and the deployment environments that are well suited to JMS appli... (more)

Guaranteed Messaging With JMS

The notion of guaranteed delivery of Java Message Service messages has been lightly touched on in other recently published articles on JMS. But what really makes a JMS message "guaranteed"? Should you just take it on faith, or would you like to know what's behind it? This article answers these questions via a detailed discussion of message persistence, internal acknowledgment rules, and message redelivery. Using excerpts condensed from the book we coauthored, Java Message Service, we'll explain how JMS guaranteed messaging works - including once-and-only-once delivery semantics,... (more)